Online Educational Resources for Every Genealogist Part 2

Tuesday, I posted about my first genealogy presentation for Twigs. It went very well even though I was a bit nervous! I posted the first part of my research findings involving free online tutorials and lessons and today I’m going to show what I found about online genealogy classes, courses, and lessons.

Online Genealogy Classes, Courses, and Lessons (unless otherwise stated, these cost money)

  • National Genealogy Society
    • Family History Skills: This is great for the beginner who would like to get started on some genealogy basics. It’s free for NGS members and not available to non-members (again, joining has some great benefits!) This course covers how to record information, how to find information, using online aids, and writing source citations.
    • American Genealogical Studies: If you’re familiar with NGS’s Home Study Course, this is what it’s become. This is all cloud based and because the assignments are graded, you will receive a certificate upon completion. At the moment, only the Basics and Guide to Documentation and Source Citation are currently available. In the past, this course has been great for those wishing to learn more about records: where to find them and when they exist. I took the Home Study Course and LOVED the ability to redo assignments and get feedback on them. If this is anything like the Home Study Course (which I would hope it would be) then I’d highly recommend it!
    • Continuing Genealogical Studies: There are two courses offered in the continuing genealogical studies tab – Civil War Research and Genetic Genealogy. Both are cloud based and have self-graded exams (so no certificate upon completion). I’ve been told these are wonderful and very informative!
    • PDF Courses: These are downloadable PDF files with self-graded exams (no certificate upon completion). They have three available: Introduction to Religious Records, Working with Deeds, and Using Federal Population Census Schedules in Genealogical Research.
  • Boston University
    • Genealogical Essentials: This is a four-week online course specifically for genealogy enthusiasts who wish for more formal training and are serious students. The cost is what you’d expect from a university but there can be deals (like the book cost included in the overall cost), not to mention being an NGS member gets you a discount.
    • Online Certificate in Genealogical Research: I took this course over the summer and discussed it here and really can’t sing it’s praises enough! I learned so much during those 15 weeks and enjoyed every moment! It is time constraining (20-30 hours of work a week) but so rewarding.
    • Advanced Forensic Genealogy: This course requires the Online Certificate in Genealogical Research in order to take it. It’s for those wishing to go further into detail about the forensic side of genealogy. It’s a four day course (with only 8 slots available for online, more slots available for in person) that is done in the summer. This year it ran from July 28-August 1st.
    • Writing Family History Narratives and Other Genealogical Works: This course also requires the Online Certificate in Genealogical Research in order to take it. This goes into detail about the writing side of genealogy and creating narratives and other works. Again, it’s a four day course that happened at the same time as the Forensic class this year and only has 8 online slots available (more for in person).
    • Civilly Uncommon: Advanced Legal Analysis for Genealogists: This course is another that requires the Online Certificate in Genealogical Research in order to take it. This is a course that is offered during the same four days as the others with the same 8-person online limit (more spaces are available for in person). This course is for genealogists who want to get more information and knowledge on the legal side of genealogy.
  • Brigham Young University Free Online Courses: All of these wonderful courses are FREE! BYU does offer a Family History degree and certificate (not online) but if you are only interested in a class or two, you can check a few out for free (these classes aren’t for credit though).
  • National Institute for Genealogical Studies: This online institute/courses offers classes for certificates in Genealogical Studies with specialization in various countries. It seems like an online university really, but specifically for genealogists. I haven’t heard from people who have taken the course but this did come up often in my research. It seems worth checking into!
  • ProGen: This is for those who wish to go the professional route, especially certification. I have been told this is a MUST for anyone considering certification, in fact. I’m on the waiting list currently and hope to get into a study group next year. The study group lasts for 19 months and goes through each chapter of Professional Genealogy. Each month’s assignment goes to the rest of your group and everyone critiques everyone’s work. I have heard wonderful reviews of this class and can’t wait to start!
  • University of Strathclyde: I heard of this through the National Genealogical Society’s conference in May. The university offers online courses in genealogy for those wishing to earn a diploma, certificate, or MSc (Masters? – I am not sure what the American equivalent would be but I believe it would be a Masters). The courses focus on British genealogy and you can earn a PG Certificate in Genealogical, Palaeographic, and Heraldic Studies. It sounds very interesting and I do want to look into this further.

Anyone else have any courses or classes you’d recommend? Any of you taken something I mentioned and wish to leave a comment about it?

On Monday I’ll discuss Institutes and Conferences! Stay tuned and enjoy your Thanksgiving if you’re celebrating it today!

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Online Educational Sources for Every Genealogist Part 1

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Online Educational Resources for Every Genealogist Part 3

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